The most important things you need to know to stay abreast of the latest developments in global governance.

Business and Human Rights: States are not off the hook

By Jerome Bellion-Jourdan – States are not off the hook in the “Business and Human Rights” agenda:  a key take away of recent events at the United Nations and beyond; a timely reminder of the “smart mix of measures” foreseen by the UN Guiding Principles for States to foster business respect for human rights; a strong call on States to act, along with business, against the background of Kofi Annan’s warning: “if we cannot make globalization work for all, in the end it will work for none.”  

Where is the ILO going with the Centenary Declaration?

By Velibor Jakovleski – The ILO’s Centenary Declaration seeks a reinvigorated role for the organization in the global governance of work. But it could end up as just another example of compromised adaptation to rapidly changing circumstances.

Humanitarian governance and localization: What kind of world is being imagined and produced?

By Kristin Bergtora Sandvik & Dennis Dijkzeul – While localization is high on the agenda for humanitarian actors, at present, humanitarian governance does not support the localization agenda. To understand better why, we explore three issues underpinning humanitarian governance: the problem construction, consolidation and growth of the sector, and the sorting of civilians. We conclude that the localization agenda is important, but for it to succeed a fundamental change of the humanitarian system is needed.

On the path(s) to international legal change

By Nina Teresa Kiderlin, Pedro José Martinez Esponda & Dorothea Endres – Challenging the common narratives of legal change, the PATHS project investigates the different pathways through which stability and change travel in the international legal order.

Lethal autonomous weapons, war crimes, and the Convention on Conventional Weapons

By Marta Bo and Taylor Woodcock – States are yet to seriously consider individual criminal responsibility for war crimes committed with LAWS. Here’s why they should.