The most important things you need to know to stay abreast of the latest developments in global governance.

The War in Ukraine and Institutional Complexity in European Security: Situating the EU’s New Strategic Compass

By Ueli Staeger and Moritz Neubert – The EU’s new security strategy, the Strategic Compass aims to expedite security and defence cooperation in Europe. To do so, it embraces a variable geometry of cooperation and a pragmatic approach to institutional overlap. But can the EU deliver on these ambitious goals? Connected to broader debates on multilateral decision-making, modalities of international cooperation, and institutional complexity, this blog post assesses the potential merits and pitfalls of the Strategic Compass.

A New International Treaty to End Plastic Pollution: From Ambition to Concrete Commitments, Meaningful Action and Effective Governance

By Frederic Bauer and Carolyn Deere Birkbeck – This post reflects on the new Plastic pollution resolution adopted by the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA) on 2 March 2022.

Inequality in global health expertise – and steps toward a pragmatic critique: Advantages of a comparative perspective

Luis Aue discusses the possibility of a more pragmatic critique of expertise. When we think in a comparative manner, he argues, ‘we start to understand that there are different ways in which politics and expertise can interact’.

Re-establishing congruence: UN peacebuilding in a shifting world order

By Sara Hellmüller – The effectiveness of the UN as the guardian of international peace and security has been questioned in recent years over its failure to bring armed conflicts, such as in Syria or Libya, to a negotiated end. When analyzing these challenges, we need to pay particular attention to structural factors related to changes in world politics.

Global Experts in Local Contexts: Why Legitimation Strategies Matter?

By Sapna Reheem Shaila – International experts must rely on diverse strategies to legitimise their expert knowledge and its application in particular settings. I make a case as to why we need to pay more attention to such legitimation strategies undertaken by experts in local contexts and how and whether these strategies enable the pursuits of global governance and democratic governance.

UN security council

Why International Organizations Hate Politics: The case of the ILO and UNEP

By Marieke Louis and Lucile Maertens – “We don’t do politics!” is often heard within international organizations (IOs) from international bureaucrats, governmental delegates or civil society representatives engaged in multilateral action. Taking these apolitical claims seriously can unveil the politics of depoliticization within IOs, such as the ILO and UNEP, and sheds new light on the legitimacy of global governance institutions.

Migration, work and rights: the case for human rights due diligence

By Janelle M. Diller – Migration vulnerability stems from onerous terms of entry, stay, work and life based on migration status defined by law. While affirming broad state discretion, international law requires states to ensure human rights, which involves legal reform, business due diligence, and labour market coordination.

Proactive Governance and Citizen Engagement

By Nilanjan Raghunath – Social inequalities exacerbated by job losses due to automation and the pandemic can be mitigated by seeking collaborative and inclusive work policies.  This requires proactive governance, a model which includes multiple players providing feedback to create opportunities such as upskilling for people of all ages.  One such example is Singapore, where tripartite consensus plays a significant role in job creation and skills evolution.  Each country should create its own inclusive model.

The Forum of Young Global Leaders and overlapping fields of power

By Julia Bethwaite – The Forum of Young Global Leaders brings together leaders from different fields across the globe, including acting ministers of state. How does the YGL programme relate to the idea of national representative democracies?

Third World Analogies and First World Solutions

By Francisco-José Quintana – Third World analogies have long become a favoured resource of U.S. critics of Donald Trump. This essay explores the references to “banana republics” and Latin America in the analysis of the storming of the U.S. capitol and argues that these analogies are normatively, historically, and analytically deficient.

Informed dissent or misinformed rebellion? Making sense of India’s farmer protests

By Lys Kulamadayil – This post reviews the 2020 agricultural reforms in India from a legal perspective. In doing so, it seeks to make sense of farmers’ adamant opposition to the reforms. It suggests that their protests should be understood as a rejection of food capitalism.

20 years of Women, Peace and Security: A Call for the Perpetual (Re)Problematization of a Problematic Agenda

By Miriam Engeler & Marissa Fortune – On the 20th anniversary of UNSCR 1325, this piece unpacks feminist critiques of the Women Peace and Security Agenda and argues that applying critical methodologies to studies of peace and security can help diagnose the flaws in WPS implementation and help reclaim the radical foundations that the Agenda was built on.